Uncanny Valley MastheadUncanny Valley Masthead

Uncanny Valley

Rating Summary

Based on 24 critic reviews
Weak Man

OpenCritic Rating

59

Top Critic Average

13%

Critics Recommend

Based on 24 critic reviews
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Game Information

Available on:PlayStation 4Feb 7, 2017
Xbox OneFeb 10, 2017
PCApr 23, 2015
PlayStation VitaFeb 7, 2017

Developer: Cowardly Creations

Genre: Adventure

Uncanny Valley is a survival horror game that includes a mix of exploration, puzzle solving and a bit of action with a lot of optional story content. We're trying to preserve the old survival horror kind of gameplay instead of following the modern trend of creating a third person shooter with horror elements. You play as a security guard named Tom at a remote facility. He's in charge of the night shift, while his lazy partner Buck is in charge of the day shift. Nights are long, so Tom starts exploring the facility and finds things he shouldn't. The story plays a huge part in the game, so saying anything more would be a major spoiler. Uncanny Valley's main difference from other games is a thing we like to call the consequence system. Whenever you fail at something, the game goes on, but with harsh consequences for your character that can impact both the story and the gameplay. For example - you fail at avoiding your attackers, meaning your character will move slower throughout the game, making it harder to escape future pursuers. The player then needs to be careful and more clever, which adds more tension to the game. Of course, there are mistakes you can do that lead to your death, but we're trying to avoid that as much as possible. Why? Because dying and repeating the same section over and over is tedious and leads to frustration. The game stops being scary if you're angry and just want to rush through it, so we think that adding such a system will still keep the tension while adding a new layer to scariness.
Uncanny Valley - Launch Trailer | PS4, PS Vita thumbnail

Uncanny Valley - Launch Trailer | PS4, PS Vita

Uncanny Valley Screenshot 1
Uncanny Valley Screenshot 2

Uncanny Valley is an unsettling story-driven survival horror where nothing is as it seems. The choices you make have meaningful consequences that will determine your fate, so you need to play times to reveal all of Uncanny Valley's secrets, which becomes so tedious.

Review in Spanish | Read full review

Uncanny Valley shows a lot of promise, but the harsh reality of its non-linear narrative structure and reliance on multiple playthroughs to make sense of it all means it is asking too much in the face of the early game's uninspired, repetitive gameplay.

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Uncanny Valley has strong presentation and an interesting story to tell but it’s held back by bad execution and cumbersome controls.

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Exploring the facility and discovering the nuances of the plot are certainly the highlights of this game, but the lack of direction is a double-edged sword, giving players the opportunity to discover as much as they can but often leaving them unsure of what exactly they are supposed to be doing.

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